Meet Pixie-Gotta Look Sharp

Meet Pixie
Meet Pixie
Meet Pixie a pointed-toe flat mule, created on a vintage 1980 last (Ah memories of my wanton youth). Pixie is my first foray into working with soling weight leather. What an experience. The leather I have is thick with a veg tan finish. I think it will make for a sturdy sole, but boy is it hard to cut. After using my scalpel (too weak), a 45mm rotary cutter and leather scissors (both hard to control on curves and often crushed rather than cut) and my regular utility knife, I was defeated.
Pixie sole
Pixie sole
I couldn't imagine how I would be able to do it. My hands hurt and were a bit numb. I wallowed in self-doubt and self-pity for about a minute and then did what any self-respecting maker would do - I went took a tour on the internet to see what I could dig up. Someone suggested an Olfa Heavy Duty Utility knife with heavy duty break off blades. Thanks to Amazon Prime, I got my new knife/blades, a 60mm rotary cutter and blades for the 60mm and 45mm the next day. I also got an electric rotary cutter, but I haven't tried it yet. The rough edge gave me an opportunity to learn about edge finishing. The insole on this baby is another piece of lighter weight leather. Between the 2 pieces and the heel, I was able to learn to bevel edges, sand and burnish edges. I got to experiment with my Dremel tool which proved to be a life saver.
Pixie Glued
Pixie Glued
Pixie Lasted
Pixie Lasted
This shoe is 4 component pieces and again I was working with all cement construction. I knew I wanted a nice finished edge to the upper so I got to incorporate topline tape and I repeated that folded edge that mimics a sewn edge with the construction. Here you can see the folded top edge and skived edges of the upper ready to be glued over the last to the French Beveled insole. ( Another tool in my tool kit!) Several wrappings and edge finishings later Pixie debuted. Even with a few warts (I need to get the upper flatter to connect more seamlessly with the sole), I love her shape, style and spunk. She's mine to test as we transition into Fall. I definitely need some more work on cutting veg tan sole material and finishing these edges. The only way to get better is to do it, so I carry on.

Meet Elba the one-strap clog

Meet Elba
Meet Elba
Elba is my first prototype. She's with a tester now to see how we she goes. Elba is a one-strap cement construction clog. The clog is a complete component made of wood with a rubber sole from Italy -very chic.
Elba shaped insole
Elba shaped insole
I chose to use a padded insole, again using the cork. My goal was to align the fit of the insole better to the outsole and cover the insole in a cleaner manner than I had done on my recycled shoes. I even tried my hand at shaping the insole to the outsole (note the curve).  I did a better job on the cover. You can see improvement in the edges and skiving. Sadly I didn't do too well on the size. In the end my insole is a bit too large. Lesson learned. Trim the insole before covering it. The decision to cut inside, outside or on a line can add or subtract a significant amount of area when several materials and components come together.
Elba Strap Construction
Elba Strap Construction
Next I attacked the weight of the leather. I have a  quantity of lightweight leather that I am using for much of my prototyping. Originally, I was going to secure the strap to the insole, but as my design developed, I decided on clog construction with decorative nails directly attaching the strap to the wood outsole. Either way, I thought the leather was too flimsy, so I backed it with cork to give it enough body. This was imperative for the nail method to work. You can see I glued my edges as if they were sewn. I skived the interior of the edges to try to get a smooth edge against the foot with partial success.
Elba Flower
Elba Flower
I had given up on the flower before I backed my strap, but as you can see, I found a really great resolution. I merely cut the floral shape and balled up the leather to create a distressed and wrinkled effect. I attached the shapes to the strap with thin leather cord that acts as the pistils. In my next pair, this will happen before I back the strap. IMG_3550 IMG_3551The nails were also a trip. A couple didn't nail in smoothly and making them symmetrical was a chore. If you look carefully at the side view you will see that I chose to use only 3 nails, my aesthetic preference. That might be a mistake. I'll have to see what my tester says about how they hold up.  

Recycling experiment = New Shoes

Recycling experiment: What would I get if I took apart a shoe I didn't like so much and a Betsey Johnson hand bag that didn't cut it and created a new shoe? This is the question I asked myself in June as the Shoe Symposium grew closer. I hadn't made any shoes in over year and I was determined to make something so I could get back into making and get some feedback as well.
sandal components
Sandal Components
Betsey Johnson Handbag
Betsey Johnson Handbag
I started by breaking down a very inexpensive pair of sandals. The wedge fit well, but I never liked the upper. No problem. I had a Betsey Johnson hand bag that had great leather and hardware, but I hated the style. So I broke that down as well.
Insole and cork glued up
Insole and cork glued up
Insole covered with Cork
Insole covered with Cork
I knew I wanted to use cork for the insole. I like a slightly textured insole so my feet don't slip. I used cement to cover the insoles and some clamps to help keep them tight while they dried.     Next, I prepared straps. Some went through vintage buckles. Others had hardware. I explored the potential on forms:
Design Development 1
Design  1
Design Development 2
Design  2
Design Development 3
Design  3
Design Development 4
Design  4
Design Development 5
Design  5
        And on feet:
Design on Foot 3
Design on Foot 3
Design on Foot 2
Design on Foot 2
Design on Foot 1
Design on Foot 1
        I made my final choice and put it all together:
Completed recycled sandal
Completed recycled sandal
These were entered into competition at the Shoe symposium primarily for feed back. I knew there were quite a few mistakes, but I wanted to pros to tell me what they saw, both good and bad. The critics did NOT know these were recycled. As with all design critique, I got quite a range. On the craft side, I needed to work on my insole and outsole alignment and getting my straps symmetrical on both feet.  Other comments included a discussion of leather to hardware weight and I had worn them too much for competition (these were recycled soles).
finished recycled sandal
Finished recycled sandal
The critics were split on the cork insole cover. (I used this because I wanted to work with cork.) One critic loved the juxtaposition of cork with the metallic. One critic said the cork was too casual with the metallic. One critic did not comment. I am thankful for the feedback and continue to work to correct the craft issues with each pair I make. I'm proudof the aesthetics and I'm happy to wear them. This recycling experiment makes me happy. I have the style shoe I like with the leather and hardware that suits me. These are truly greater than the sum of their parts.

Shoe Pop at International Pop

shoe pop Delila doble plataforma 1967
Delila doble plataforma 1967
Shoe Pop at the Philadelphia Museum of Art's new exhibit, International Pop. There's not much fashion included, but this display sure does make a statement. Created by Argentinian artist, Dalila Puzzovio in 1967 as a reaction to the lack of response to trends in Argentinian Fashion, these colorful shoes were an avante-garde, contemporary couture contrast to the usual (at the time) black and brown styles of the day. The award winning sculpture was displayed in the windows of Argentinian shoe chain, Grimoldi, the perfect foil for blurring the lines between mass-production and Art. These baby are certainly part of the shoe vernacular today. International Pop February 24, 2016 - May 15, 2016    

And the winner is…

Heck with the dresses on the red carpet, the shoe design winner is Jimmie Choo. I wish the starlet would choose gowns that show their shoes, but that is generally not the case. Thank heaven for Footwear News's big reveal. Charlize Theron, Reese Witherspoon, Olivia Munn, Isla Fisher and Heidi Klum all sported various sparkly, stiletto sandals with minimal straps. This year featured the platform Pearl (a rising red carpet star) that gives height, other popular styles - the Molly and the Minnie
The Minnie
Minnie
the molly
Molly
Pearl
Pearl
.